Loge Forget Me Not Nr. 1035 i.Or. Dortmund
VEREINIGTE GROSSLOGEN VON DEUTSCHLAND UNITED GRAND LODGES OF GERMANY http://www.freimaurer.org/
From its introduction into Germany in 1737 through to the Nazi era before the second World War, masonry in Germany was very divided in structure and consisted of a number of independent Grand Lodges.  As they considerd it a threat, the Nazi regime which came to power in 1933 banned masonry  and during the war a large number of the 80000 pre-war freemasons were interred in concentration camps, many of whom were executed.  Shortly after the war under the Allied Forces, Lodges started to reappear in the Western Zone and Berlin, albeit in the Russian Zone and later DDR it continued to be forbidden.  In 1949, some 174 lodges united under the United Grand Lodge of Freemasons in Germany (later to  become the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons in Germany).  Two further Grand Lodges namely, Grand Land Lodge of Freemasons in Germany and Grand Lodge Three World Globes did not join and continued with their own regulation.  In 1958, after many unsuccessful attempts, and much assistance from the United Grand Lodge of England, the United Grand Lodges of Germany was founded.  This was later joined by the Provincial American Canadian Grand Lodge and Provincial Grand Lodge of British Freemasons in Germany, developing over the years into the following present day structure. Großloge Alten Freien und Angenommenen Maurer von Deutschland (GL AF&AM) Große Landesloge der Freimaurer von Deutschland (GL FvD) Große National-Mutterloge “Zu den Drei Weltkugeln” (GNML 3WK) American Canadian Grand Lodge (ACGL) Grand Lodge of British Freemasons in Germany (GL BFG) The founding of a United Grand Lodges of Germany (Vereinigte Grosslogen von Deutschland VGLvD) to represent the international interests of German masonry was, and still is essential to universal masonic recognition, which presently amounts to some 175 Grand Lodges worldwide.  The VGLvD which is located in Berlin is headed by a Grand Master and Deputy Grand Master who are elected by the Lodges every three years.  They are assisted by other Grand Officers and administrative staff.   Although the five partner Grand Lodges remain autonomous in their self-regulation and internal procedures they are nevertheless united in an adherence to the basic principles of masonry and compliance with the “Magna Charter der Bruderschaft der deutschen Freimaurer” which was ratified in 1958.  The regulatory body which oversees compliance with the Magna Charter and many other administrative aspects is the Senate, consisting of proportional representation from the five Grand Lodges.
Loge Forget Me Not Nr. 1035 i.Or. Dortmund
Loge Forget Me Not Nr. 1035 i.Or. Dortmund
VEREINIGTE GROSSLOGEN VON DEUTSCHLAND UNITED GRAND LODGES OF GERMANY http://www.freimaurer.org/
From its introduction into Germany in 1737 through to the Nazi era before the second World War, masonry in Germany was very divided in structure and consisted of a number of independent Grand Lodges.  As they considerd it a threat, the Nazi regime which came to power in 1933 banned masonry  and during the war a large number of the 80000 pre-war freemasons were interred in concentration camps, many of whom were executed.  Shortly after the war under the Allied Forces, Lodges started to reappear in the Western Zone and Berlin, albeit in the Russian Zone and later DDR it continued to be forbidden.  In 1949, some 174 lodges united under the United Grand Lodge of Freemasons in Germany (later to  become the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons in Germany).  Two further Grand Lodges namely, Grand Land Lodge of Freemasons in Germany and Grand Lodge Three World Globes did not join and continued with their own regulation.  In 1958, after many unsuccessful attempts, and much assistance from the United Grand Lodge of England, the United Grand Lodges of Germany was founded.  This was later joined by the Provincial American Canadian Grand Lodge and Provincial Grand Lodge of British Freemasons in Germany, developing over the years into the following present day structure. Großloge Alten Freien und Angenommenen Maurer von Deutschland (GL AF&AM) Große Landesloge der Freimaurer von Deutschland (GL FvD) Große National-Mutterloge “Zu den Drei Weltkugeln” (GNML 3WK) American Canadian Grand Lodge (ACGL) Grand Lodge of British Freemasons in Germany (GL BFG) The founding of a United Grand Lodges of Germany (Vereinigte Grosslogen von Deutschland VGLvD) to represent the international interests of German masonry was, and still is essential to universal masonic recognition, which presently amounts to some 175 Grand Lodges worldwide.  The VGLvD which is located in Berlin is headed by a Grand Master and Deputy Grand Master who are elected by the Lodges every three years.  They are assisted by other Grand Officers and administrative staff.   Although the five partner Grand Lodges remain autonomous in their self-regulation and internal procedures they are nevertheless united in an adherence to the basic principles of masonry and compliance with the “Magna Charter der Bruderschaft der deutschen Freimaurer” which was ratified in 1958.  The regulatory body which oversees compliance with the Magna Charter and many other administrative aspects is the Senate, consisting of proportional representation from the five Grand Lodges.